Sunday, 27 May 2018

Dartmoor: Some Tors North of Two Bridges (Part 2)

Crow Tor

Continuing on from part 1, I was a little apprehensive as I was heading into new territory but happy to have a full water supply on hand. Higher White Tor was first, a flat granite tor that I was rather disappointed with. It looks better from the road.

Approaching Higher White Tor

Higher White Tor

Higher White Tor Pile of Stones

Higher White Tor Pile of Stones

Higher White Tor

I crossed the stile where the ground became boggy, even in the hottest of temperatures the country had ever experienced. As I got closer to the tor I warmed to it, another flat granite tor but less visited because of its location more in the wilderness. I like the atmosphere around it and the granite features.

Lower White Tor

Lower White Tor

Now it was time to head back to Two Bridges, but not without grabbing a few more bags along the way. I beelined to Little Whiten Tor, my favourite tor on the walk so far, although being tiny. This smart outcrop is tucked away from sight from Higher White Tor but has a commanding view of Longaford Tor.

Little Whiten Tor

Little Whiten Tor

Little Whiten Tor

I crossed the West Dart River and ascended to Little Crow Tor. Anyone else who knows of this tor knows that it is more an outlier of its much better neighbour.

West Dart River

Little Crow Tor

Little Crow Tor

Crow Tor (left) from Little Crow Tor

Little Crow Tor

Little Crow Tor

Little did I know the next bag, Crow Tor would be my favourite tor of the day and in fact out of every tor I have successfully bagged so far. It has a commanding position above the West Dart River's tributaries and Wistman's Wood with stunning views. I like the location and shape of the tor in addition to its fabulous geology. Lastly, the name is cool and I think that the name for a tor is just as important as the rocks themselves.

Crow Tor and Ponies

Crow Tor

Crow Tor

Crow Tor

I found the stile due south and crossed the river again, making my way past Wistman's Wood, noticing the Buller's Stone to my right so I visited; it also meant shade! I'm not really a fan of visiting these lone rocks with inscriptions on because I prefer something more natural, like a tor. That said, I was surprised by its location and found the writing easy to read.

It says:

BY PERMISSION OFHRH THE PRINCE OF WALESWENTWORTH BULLERON SEPT 16th 1868 CUT DOWN A TREE NEAR THIS SPOT IT MEASURED 9IN IN DIAMETER AND APPEARED TO BE ABOUT163 YEARS OLD.

Buller's Stone

Buller's Stone

It was then a simple walk back to Two Bridges for a Scone and Jam after a hot 7 miles walking bagging some of the tors north of Two Bridges.

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